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How To Write A Killer HTML Resource Box…The Easy Way
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I see this more times than I’d like to admit:

An author has an absolutely gorgeous text resource box, but their HTML resource box is just a skeleton of what it should be with just their keywords hyperlinked.

I think that the thing that trips most folks up is they know that the perk of the HTML resource box is getting to hyperlink their keywords, and it seems like they think that if their keywords are hyperlinked that that’s all they need to do.

Wrong!

Your HTML resource box should be every bit as descriptive and informative as your text resource box. Your resource box is a piece of marketing content for your website, so you need to take special care when putting it together.

Doing the HTML resource box can seem a little tricky because you may think you can’t say “for more info, go to => www.mysite.com” You may think that you need to totally rephrase things so that the HTML resource box makes sense with the link appearing as hyperlinked keywords rather than as an action statement (“go to my site here =>”).

I’d like to share with your a little trick I have for making a stellar HTML resource box the EASY way:

Here’s what you do:

1) Write a great text resource box.

Yup, that’s right–just write a text resource box with the following information:

a) an author name

b) a little bio info

c) a reason to click through to your website

d) a link to your website

e) Oh, and your resource box also needs to be 450 characters (including spaces) or less, which is what most publishers will accept.

What would a great resource box look like?

Let’s take a look at one of the resource boxes that we’ve done a makeover on at our Resource Box Rehab Lab:

Kevin Boyle is a sales coach and trainer with 10 years experience who has helped thousands of people improve their sales results and turn their companies around. Would you like to learn cold calling techniques that get results? Learn how to dramatically improve your sales and marketing results and blow your competition out of the water by claiming your FREE 8 part home study course at =>
http://www.salesmasterybook.com/wp_blog/
This is the made over resource box of Kevin Boyle.
His “before” resource box just had the words “cold calling” hyperlinked with no other info. So, obviously his keywords are “cold calling”, so it may be alright to use a variation of that phrase with “cold calls”.
If Kevin was alright with that, he could have this as an HTML resource box:
Kevin Boyle is a sales coach and trainer with 10 years experience who has helped thousands of people improve their sales results and turn their companies around. Would you like prospects to return your cold calls? Learn how to dramatically improve your sales and marketing results and blow your competition out of the water by claiming your FREE 8 part home study course at => http://www.salesmasterybook.com/wp_blog/
Or, if he really wanted to use the keyword phrase cold calling, he could tweak the text to read:
Kevin Boyle is a sales coach and trainer with 10 years experience who has helped thousands of people improve their sales results and turn their companies around. Would you like to learn cold calling techniques that get results? Learn how to dramatically improve your sales and marketing results and blow your competition out of the water by claiming your FREE 8 part home study course at => http://www.salesmasterybook.com/wp_blog/
And then he could hyperlink the term “cold calling” and the URL.
Is it alright to have 2 links in the resource box?
In a situation like this, I think it is–both of those links are going back to the same site, so it’s not like you’re trying to convince folks to go to two different sites. And one of the links is a written out URL, while the other is keywords hyperlinked.
There is a benefit to including your written out URL in your HTML resource box. Why?
1) It helps build “URL awareness” with the reader. If I see a resource box that has the term “cold calling” hyperlinked and no written out URL, then I have to do some investigating to figure out what the website address of the site is. I need to hover over the link or click the link and then get the URL from there.
However, if the URL is written out, I can easily see what the website URL is without having to do extra work. Suppose I declined to click that link as I was looking at the article, but then later I thought–”Hmm, I think I would like to get that free 8 part home study course he was offering.”
If the reader was able to see your written out URL, they could simply remember “I think it was salesmasterybook.com something or other” and going to the URL would get them real close to where they wanted to be. But if there was no written out URL that the reader could bring to mind, they would have to search for your article, then click through from the resource box. It’s a couple extra steps that could be avoided.
2) It’s a good safety net in case the HTML somehow gets removed from a resource box. When you publish your article as a free reprint article, you never know what website or publisher will pick the article up. Human errors can happen–what if the HTML somehow got messed up when someone was reprinting your article? If you also have a written out URL, then at least your URL would be visibe and folks could still find you.
Some notes:
  • Limit your keywords to no more than 3 word. Some publishers won’t accept articles that hyperlink more than 3 keywords in a resource box.
  • Be sure that both of your links are going to the same site. The resource box is a pretty small area, so you want to use all your marketing efforts to convince folks to go to one site. You don’t have room to convince them to go to multiple sites.
Making an HTML resource box doesn’t have to be hard. The next time you want to do an HTML resource box, just use your text resource box and hyperlink the URL and your keywords.
Was this helpful? I hope so! If you have any special tips for how you craft your own HTML resource boxes, please chime in!
Related Resources:

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11 Responses to “How To Write A Killer HTML Resource Box…The Easy Way”

  1. jules rosen says:

    as a newbie – can you show me what you mean by

    “HTML resource box ”

    an example please as below ?

    should be every bit as descriptive and informative as your text resource box. Your resource box is a piece of marketing content for your website, so you need to take special care when putting it together.

    thanks
    julius

  2. Steve Shaw says:

    Hi Julius,

    Sure thing, and thank you for your question. An HTML resource box is one that allows you to use anchor text (your keywords) to hyperlink to you website.

    A text resource box just allows you insert a fully written out URL such as http://www.submityourarticle.com

    An HTML resource box will instead link keywords (as I’ve just done), so you can tell by looking at the links whether a resource box is an HTML one or not.

    The perk of the HTML resource box is that you can hyperlink your keywords, which packs more of an SEO punch.

    I’ve added a new entry under “Related Resources” that tells you “What is an HTML resource box”.

    I hope that helps :)

  3. Ted says:

    Thank you -some really good tips here on writing the resource box in such a way as to gain the maximum benefit.I will definitely make this a source of reference for my next article.

  4. Paul says:

    Excellent article Steve. My own resource box have always been way too short and undescriptive. I am always in a hurry to write the article and usually zip thruough the BIO section. Thanks for the info…
    Paul

  5. Dave says:

    I think I need to improve mine

  6. Adam G says:

    Steve,
    I agree with the above comment on rushing through the article. We are often in such a hurry to write the article that we breeze through the bio section(resource box). I do think it is very important to include an action step, and an author description makes sense. Thanks for the article.

  7. Rus Morgan says:

    This is just a comment about the regular Resource Box. I don’t know about the rest of you but my articles are going to focus on one subject. My website ‘Dogsx2′ focuses on dogs, miniature schnauzers in particular. I have written fifteen so far and finally (following Steve’s lead) I knew that I would have to shorten the Resourse writing time or I would never get threw. So the next time I wrote one I took the time to not only to tweak the three articles from the one, but to right there create three versions of the Resource Box. They all say basically the same thing but in a different way. I use ‘Clipboard Buddy3′ as a storage agency and the first three words of the Resource Box on file (So that I can see it, is the number of words so that I can differentiate it from the rest. I wrote them all so they would have as near 450 spaces as possible but not exactly. Now I pick the one I want to attach to the Article, insert it into the Resource Box, delete the first three words and I’m ready to roll. Saves Beau coupe time when getting the article ready for publication.). Way to go Steve.

  8. Wonderful tips…no doubt, being an article writer and article marketer I know these are timeless tips.

  9. [...] How To Write An HTML Resource Box…The Easy Way! – I’ve noticed that some authors will have great text resource boxes but their HTML ones are just bare bones! This article teaches how to have a completely fleshed out HTML resource box. [...]

  10. Amod Oke says:

    Wonderful article, i am just going to register to submityourarticle.com right now, but before doing that, i was searching for a guide to a resource box, and WHAT A COINCIDENCE, I found one right here! :) Thanks a heap…

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